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Teaching & Learning

English

So much more than just a story

To inspire a passion for words and a love of language which will allow you to engage with the world in which we live. To provide you with skills to enter into debate on important social, moral and political issues, through a range of stimulating texts.

The English Team
Mrs S Fortnum Director of English
Mr G Clark Assistant Headteacher, Teacher of English
Mrs N Cook Lead Teacher of English
Miss L Dunleavy Leading Teacher of English
Miss J Marsden Teacher of English
Mrs R Mullen Teacher of English
Miss K Perry Teacher of English
Miss A Platten Teacher of English
Mrs L Poole Teacher of English
Mr F Starkey Teacher of English
Mrs B Tamminen Teacher of English
Mr L West Teacher of English
Miss O Windmill Teacher of English

The Curriculum

Years 7 and 8
All young people study English for 3 hours each week in both Year 7 and Year 8.  An additional literacy lesson, which includes a reading focus supported through the Accelerated Reader scheme, is timetabled for all in Year 7, and those who study one language (rather than two) in Year 8.

Year 7

Transitionary novels Novel 1: Skellig, Wonder, The Giver, Chinese, Cinderella

Poetry Ballads

Play Gothic, Room 13

Non-Fiction:  Autobiography

Novel 2 Treasure Island

Shakespeare Richard 3rd

Year 8

Novel 1:  Trash; Storm Catchers; Private Peaceful

Poems from other Cultures

Non-fiction Text Types

Shakespeare’s Hamlet

Anthology of 19th century texts

Novel 2:  Stone Cold; Unique; Trash

The English curriculum at key stage 3 has been designed to enable our young people to study a range fiction and non-fiction texts; they develop skills in discussion, delivering presentations, creating and analysing. Whilst some units focus purely on analytical responses to texts and others involve developing specific writing skills, the study of English provides a platform from which students can access the wider curriculum.

Agreed concepts are developed across the curriculum including:

  • Structure and coherence
  • Spelling, punctuation and grammar
  • Awareness of impact
  • Understanding of context
  • Using evidence
  • Analysing techniques
  • Vocabulary

Year 9

In Year 9, our young people study a range of literature and continue to develop their language skills.

Me Myself and I: autobiographical writing

A Christmas Carol

Poetry Anthology: Disturbed Voices;

Romeo and Juliet

Of Mice and Men, Animal Farm

Spoken Language and writing to persuade/argue

Years 10 and 11

Our young people complete two GCSE English qualifications:

  • GCSE English Language (AQA specification)
  • GCSE English Literature (AQA specification)

Aims of the course:

  • To develop communication skills through reading, writing and the spoken word.
  • To develop enjoyment and understanding of a range of text types, both fictional and
    non-fictional.
  • To develop analysis to write in a range of genres and for a range of purposes.

Course content:

  • Students study Shakespeare play, pre-nineteenth century prose, a modern play, a range of poetry and other fiction and non-fiction texts.
  • Students complete one oral assessment.

English Language Units

English Literature Units

  • Writing 1 – Descriptive / narrative
  • Writing 2 – Presenting a viewpoint
  • Reading – Non-fiction text
  • Poetry from the Anthology
  • Modern Texts
  • 19th Century Novel
  • Shakespeare play

 

Overview of Years 10 and 11  

Key Stage 4 English Language and Literature

Year 10

An Inspector Calls, Creative writing, Jekyll and Hyde, Reading fiction extracts, Power and Conflict Poetry, Creative writing

Year 11

Reading and comparing non fiction texts, Macbeth, Macbeth, Writing non-fiction, Unseen Poetry, Exam revision, GCSE exams

Assessment

Assessment is continuous in the classroom. Teachers regularly question and use low stakes testing to check understanding.  Feedback is provided verbally lessons and in exercise books as appropriate. 

At regular intervals, Key Marked Work assesses how well knowledge and skills have been learned.  Students receive more detailed written feedback on this work, sharing WWW (What Went Well) and how TIF (To Improve Further).  After each piece of Key Marked Work students will respond on their TIF, which is often posed as a question, completing their MRI (My Response Is).

Each year students also complete an end of year examination.

GCSE External Assessment

Each GCSE qualification is assessed through two examination papers. The Spoken Language element is completed during lessons in Year 11.

English Language

Paper 1

Explorations in Creative Reading and Writing

50%

Paper 2

Writers’ Viewpoints and Perspectives

50%

 

Spoken language

Separate endorsement

 

English Literature

Paper 1

Shakespeare and the 19thcentury novel

40%

Paper 2

Modern texts and poetry

60%

Homework and Additional Resources

Across the year groups, teachers will set homework as appropriate.  Homework will be set to enhance learning not simply for the sake of setting homework.  This may include written work, research or revision.  In addition, students are encouraged to:

  • Read regularly and independently at home in order to develop their understanding of literary and non-fiction texts and to expand their vocabulary.   
  • Discuss the content of their lessons and to further research the issues being studied in the classroom to broaden their understanding.
  • Read the daily broadsheet newspapers (or their associated Apps).
  • To spell correctly and to check all homework thoroughly for spelling, punctuation and grammar.

All students in years 7, 8 and 9 are encouraged to complete the English activities in their Learning Beyond the Classroom booklets. 

Additional resources to support learning in GCSE English Language and GCSE English Literature: 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/education

https://www.gcsepod.com

https://www.englishapp.pixl.org.uk  

We also recommend the purchase of revision guides through the school to further assist students’ work outside the classroom. 

N.B.  Where required, passwords have been provided to students directly.  For further support with passwords, please contact your Head of House.

 

Sixth Form 

There are three A Level English courses for students to choose from:

  • English Language (OCR)
  • English Language and Literature (AQA)
  • English Literature (AQA)

A Level English Language (OCR)

Aims of the course:

This course looks at English in its various forms and contexts.  It develops a variety of skills including critical reading, data analysis, evaluation and the ability to develop and sustain arguments.

 

Course Content:

  • Exploring Language             

- Language under the microscope.  Writing about a topical language issue.  Comparing and contrasting texts

  • Dimensions of Linguistic Variation 

- Child language acquisition.  Language in the media.  Language change

  • Independent Language Research (coursework)
    • Investigation 2000 to 2500 words.  Academic poster 750 – 1000 words

 

A Level English Language

Year 12

Literary Genres:  Tragedy

Shakespeare

 

Literary Genres:  Tragedy

Shakespeare

Paper 2

Literary genres: Prose and Poetry

Anthology poetry

Paper 2

Literary genres: Prose and Poetry

Anthology poetry

Revision and exam practice

 

Introduction to NEA

Literary genres: drama

Death of a Salesman

Literary genres: drama

Death of a Salesman

Paper 2

Literary genres: Prose and Poetry

Tess of the D’Urbervilles

Paper 2

Literary genres: Prose and Poetry

Tess of the D’Urbervilles

Revision and exam practice

 

Introduction to NEA

Year 13

NEA

 

 

Crime Writing Novel

Crime Writing Novel

Revision of Shakespeare

Revision

Exams

NEA

 

 

Crime Poetry

Crime Poetry

Crime Unseen Texts

Revision

Exams

Assessment:

  • 80% Examination
  • 20% Coursework

 

A Level English Literature (AQA)

Aims of the course:

This course involves an in depth study of carefully selected texts that provide students with a reading list for life, promoting the beauty of language and the variety of its effects.


Course Content:

  • Aspects of Tragedy – Study of three texts:  One Shakespeare text; a second drama text and one further text, of which one must be written pre-1900
  • Elements of Crime or Political Writing – Study of three texts: One post-2000 prose text; one poetry and one further text, of which one must be written pre-1900
  • Theory and Independence (coursework) – Study of two texts: one poetry and one prose text, informed by study of the critical anthology

In Year 12 students complete the following:

  • Literary Genres: Drama.  Aspects of tragedy
  • Literary Genres: Prose and Poetry: Aspects of tragedy

In Year 13 students will complete the following:

  •  Literary Genres.  Aspects of tragedy
  • Texts and Genres – Crime writing
  • Coursework:  Theory and independence.  2 essays

A Level English Literature

Year 12

The Mechanics of Language

Grammar

 

The Mechanics of Language

Grammar.

.

Gender and Topical Language Issue

 

Power and Topical Language Issue

Technology and Topical Language Issue

Introduction to NEA

Lexis/Semantics

Pragmatics

Phonology

Discourse

 

Language under the MIcroscope.

Analysis of Single Text

Language under the Microscope

Analysis of Single Text

Comparing and contrasting texts- spoken and written.

 

Revision of Topics

Introduction to NEA

Year 13

Language Acquisition

Language Acquisition / NEA

Academic Poster

Comparing and contrasting revision skills

Revision: Synoptic

 

Language Change

Language Change / NEA

Language Change

Language in the Media

Revision

Exams

 

Assessment:

  • 80% Examination
  • 20% Coursework

 

A Level English Language and Literature (AQA)

This course is delivered as part of The Consortium offer.

Course Content:

  • Telling Stories – Methods of language analysis.  Remembered places (AQA Anthology – Paris).  Imagined worlds (The Lovely Bones – Alice Sebold).  Poetic voices (Works of John Doone, Robert Browning, Carol Ann Duffy and Seamus Heaney)
  • Exploring Conflicts – Methods of language analysis. Writing about society (The Kite Runner – Khaled Hosseini).  Dramatic encounters (All My Sons – Arthur Miller)
  • Making Connections (coursework) – Methods in language analysis.  Investigation 2500 to 3000 words.

Assessment:

  • 80% Examination
  • 20% Coursework

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